Books

len on September 13th, 2014

All theology is local. It’s just that it’s taken us a while to admit it. But of course that’s just a starting point, and it drives us toward the need for an actual practice of the interpretive community. Have you read any of these books? How did they differ? Which was the most helpful? Where […]

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len on August 22nd, 2014

Reviewed here: Englewood Review “In this thoughtful and interesting work, Leonard explores the importance of place, locality and presence to the Christian faith. In an age when we see the rise of the network to the demise of geographic location contemporary expressions of the neighborhood can feel like co-habilitating strangers. This book creatively explores the […]

Continue reading about No Home Like Place: A Christian Theology

len on August 4th, 2014

Back in 2009 Roger Helland I began talking about the integration of mission and spirituality: that these were never meant to be two parallel tracks, but a rhythm of life in discipleship. That book came out around 240 pages, and is aimed at college and seminary students and others doing serious theological reflection. It left […]

Continue reading about An Introduction to a Missional Spirituality

len on August 2nd, 2014

Who had heard of “missional” church prior to 1998 (the publication by the GOCN)? Now “missional” is everywhere. What really changed? Sometimes we need new language in order to see. The language of “place” recovers a lost imagination, one obscured in the legacy of Modernity where we traded “place” for “space,” the concrete for the […]

Continue reading about An Introduction to a Theology of Place

len on July 23rd, 2014

“In this thoughtful and interesting work, Leonard explores the importance of place, locality and presence to the Christian faith. In an age when we see the rise of the network to the demise of geographic location contemporary expressions of the neighborhood can feel like co-habilitating strangers. This book creatively explores the place of Christianity to […]

Continue reading about a Christian theology of place

len on July 22nd, 2014

Who had heard of “missional” church prior to 1998 (the publication by the GOCN)? Now “missional” is everywhere. What really changed? Sometimes we need new language in order to see. The language of “place” recovers a lost imagination, one obscured in the legacy of Modernity where we traded “place” for “space,” the concrete for the […]

Continue reading about Theology of Place – books

len on July 13th, 2014

IVP has released this book- subtitle “Global Awakenings in Theology and Praxis” – new this month. A wide and diverse group of contributors – diverse in location and in perspective. In an interview with the editors IVP editor David Congdon asks: “How would you characterize the ‘evangelical’ nature of this project? What positive resources do […]

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len on July 11th, 2014

I’ve finished the two introductory volumes I began working on last summer. They are each 85 pages and 12,000 words, with lots of full color images. The first is an introduction to theology of place, and the second, an introduction to missional spirituality. I considered checking with a major publisher before doing the layout work […]

Continue reading about INTRO – place and missional spirituality

len on June 24th, 2014

I’ve finished the two introductory volumes I began working on last summer. They are each 85 pages and 12,000 words, with lots of full color images. The first is an introduction to theology of place, and the second, an introduction to missional spirituality. I considered checking with a major publisher before doing the layout work […]

Continue reading about Introduction – 85 pages

len on June 3rd, 2014

It used to be such a simple problem. The culture was secular, the church was sacred. That easy dichotomy was probably never really so easy, but the time when we could pretend it was true has long since passed. But there is still another layer of complexity, and Jamie Smith is helping us understand the […]

Continue reading about how (not) to be secular